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Thread: Starcraft II Cheesy? The Original Isn't Exactly Shakespeare.

  1. #21

    Default Re: Starcraft II Cheesy? The Original Isn't Exactly Shakespeare.

    Quote Originally Posted by KaiseStratosTygo View Post
    Yeah, they had still images because the Cartridge couldn't hold the graphical data aside from the Intro sequence.

    Go watch a couple SC64 videos to see what I mean.

    The game itself's graphics (for an already simple graphically) game was toned down, and even a few of the missions were made smaller because of Cart constraints (I have a playthrough of the Protoss Campaign and Mission 10 is several times smaller than on the PC)
    Figures. You know when they said it'd come out for the N64 back then, I thought Blizzard was nuts. Very few RTS games can work on a console, as far as I knew, back then....

  2. #22

    Default Re: Starcraft II Cheesy? The Original Isn't Exactly Shakespeare.

    Quote Originally Posted by Drake Clawfang View Post
    Could you elaborate?
    Which part? About how the turn of events differs? In Rebel Yell, I understand why Raynor does what he does throughout all his appearances and what he's capable of doing and not doing. He's limited by what the world gives him - he's given lemons, he tries to make lemonade. In WoL, Raynor can exact multiple victories whilst apparently being drunk and depressed throughout it all (or not - it's hard to tell) because he's just also apparently the best commander since like forever. His story in WoL is more or less aimless until the very end until Valerian tells him about the truth about the artifacts and gets his final mission, which coincidentally happens to also help him alleviate him of his depression if he succeeds. The man can do anything because the plot just has him seemingly do so for no regards to any sort of limitations to ground the fiction.

    Quote Originally Posted by Drake Clawfang View Post
    I found it hilarious that several people didn't care for my mocking the plot holes, contrivances, and skewed characterization of the original game, then applauded me for doing the same with the sequel.
    Are you sure they were the exact same people? For me, I didn't find your Sc2 parody to be as funny as the first one since the "jokes" were already on display in what we got with WoL.

    Quote Originally Posted by Drake Clawfang View Post
    My personal favorite joke for the Ep I parody, which was not mentioned in the OP: Raynor and Kerrigan pretty much laugh at the idea of Duke being shot down behind zerg lines and grumble about being sent to rescue him, then the very next mission Kerrigan is like "no one deserves to have the zerg unleashed on them". True, there is a difference there in that the entire planet will be overrun and not just the Confederates, but it's still a very hollow and hypocritical sentiment.
    Oh yeah, I have raised the point of how potentially morally inconsistent Kerrigan and Raynor are before. I mean, they accept using a weapon of mass destruction that will have confirmed casualties in one case but not in another. Truth be told though, everyone is morally inconsistent to some degree and this doesn't necessarily make it a "bad thing" in terms of narrative construction, it's just something interesting to think about.

    Quote Originally Posted by Drake Clawfang View Post
    That's true, and SC1's story having problems does not automatically excuse SC2 from having the same. However, having taken a closer look at SC1, and read most of the novels for the series that came before SC2, I'm of the opinion this is just the sort of universe it is and the story Starcraft wants to tell, and I go with that.
    You know, I get this. My POV is from not having read the EU such that my primary guide for what the universe is was the original game and manual. As such, there's quite marked difference between Sc1 and Sc2. It's funny though because Gradius has read up on the lore and should theoretically be inured to the plentiful and obvious contrivances that are on display now in that universe and yet he rails against it. We can't say he didn't read the EU wrong. Maybe it is just that the quality of writing itself is poor.

    Quote Originally Posted by Drake Clawfang View Post
    Fair enough. However, SC2 does try to take itself seriously at times, and it is telling a big story in its own right. In addition to the overarcing plot of the xel'naga returning and the hybrids, we have Kerrigan's character arc where she becomes a shifty but more heroic Queen of Blades, we're going to see Artanis trying to reunite the protoss who were already internally barely held together, the fall of Arcturus, Raynor's struggle between idealism and cynicism, and Valerian Mengsk's development from an upstart snot to a noble emperor.
    My main contention with the story is not really about the content but rather in how it's constructed/delivered by the writers and received by the viewer. I actually don't mind that Kerrigan got deinfested and then reinfested again or that Raynor actually had an all-consuming love with Kerrigan for all-time no matter what. It's how these things are presented to us and subsequently, whether it resonates or not based on how it was presented (or not presented as the case may be).

    I don't doubt the story is large or potentially serious, but I've never really gotten the importance of the stories so far in Sc2. The focus on Raynor and Kerrigan on wholly Terran matters (HotS only really use the Zerg as a backdrop to Kerrigan's Terran focused matters) for two-thirds of a trilogy that is supposed to be about the Hybrids is somewhat jarring since the story so far has been about Terran stuff and not Hybrids. So, why should I even care about the Protoss or Hybrids? It's because the game wants us to! That's not how a well crafted story works and as a result, the whole trilogy seems like an unfocused mish-mash of disconnected stories of stuff happening.

    Quote Originally Posted by Drake Clawfang View Post
    No, we don't. Just saying, Arcturus was wrong about that and yes, may have lied about it if he knew about the zerg as far back as he did.
    I've always taken that quote from Mengsk as him self-justifying his actions against the Confeds and that he's not lying since he doesn't really know the whole story but constructing a reasonable narrative in his mind based on the information at hand.

    Quote Originally Posted by Drake Clawfang View Post
    How the heck did Zeratul find out about the cerebrates? And how did he know that the void energies of the dark templar could permanently kill them? Okay, let's presume Zasz was a test and he didn't know for sure; then where did he have the idea to try?
    I assume the Nerazim are good at reconnaisance and intelligence gathering in addition to their capabilities as assassin (stealth has a lot of functions afterall), so it couldn't be that hard for them to discover a cerebrate on the world the Zerg set up as their main base in the sector. They did get called there by Kerrigan's unwitting psychic emanations afterall. Plus, Dark Templar are known for being assassins - it's a no-brainer that they would try to attempt such strike against the Zerg if they could.

    As to whether they knew Dark Templar could kill cerebrates, I throw an inverted question back at you. Why would you presume that the Protoss would know that ordinary assassination attempts not utilising Dark Templar would fail? Answer is, you can't! They didn't know until they tried. The fact that they had Dark templar, who excel at assassinations, and had no other recourse of assaulting them conventionally having Tassadar hiding on Char and not receiving ongoing assistance from Aiur, probably prompted them to try it.
    Yes, that's right! That is indeed ME on the right.


    _______________________________________________

  3. #23

    Default Re: Starcraft II Cheesy? The Original Isn't Exactly Shakespeare.

    Quote Originally Posted by Turalyon View Post
    Which part? About how the turn of events differs? In Rebel Yell, I understand why Raynor does what he does throughout all his appearances and what he's capable of doing and not doing. He's limited by what the world gives him - he's given lemons, he tries to make lemonade. In WoL, Raynor can exact multiple victories whilst apparently being drunk and depressed throughout it all (or not - it's hard to tell) because he's just also apparently the best commander since like forever. His story in WoL is more or less aimless until the very end until Valerian tells him about the truth about the artifacts and gets his final mission, which coincidentally happens to also help him alleviate him of his depression if he succeeds. The man can do anything because the plot just has him seemingly do so for no regards to any sort of limitations to ground the fiction.
    Fair enough. The Hanson and Tosh missions, while fine subplots, subtract from focus on the Horner and Tychus plots, where the real meat of the plot is.

    I always thought that they should have given you less than 200 supply for the campaign, so the player has to rely on small but effective squads to conduct missions, and maybe hiring mercenaries increases your max supply a bit. Or perhaps certain missions reward more credits than others to give players incentive to do them earlier. Blizzard really didn't get as creative as they could have with the campaign.

    You know, I get this. My POV is from not having read the EU such that my primary guide for what the universe is was the original game and manual. As such, there's quite marked difference between Sc1 and Sc2. It's funny though because Gradius has read up on the lore and should theoretically be inured to the plentiful and obvious contrivances that are on display now in that universe and yet he rails against it. We can't say he didn't read the EU wrong. Maybe it is just that the quality of writing itself is poor.
    Well, I've been writing mission pages for the original game at SC wiki, and dug out Queen of Blades a bit to remind myself how the Tassadar-Zeratul-Raynor's dynamic worked there. Zeratul is just as melodramatic as in SC2, refusing to give straight answers to folks and talking them into realizations instead, because he thinks people trust information they deduce on their own more than what other people tell them outright. Then of course this bit to Kerrigan is right at home in SC2's script.

    "Your coming has been foretold... You are part of the culmination. But not the end of it. You shall show the way, the path that must be taken, the realigning of old truths no longer valid. Yours is not the hand, but your very existence provides necessary instruction."

    My main contention with the story is not really about the content but rather in how it's constructed/delivered by the writers and received by the viewer. I actually don't mind that Kerrigan got deinfested and then reinfested again or that Raynor actually had an all-consuming love with Kerrigan for all-time no matter what. It's how these things are presented to us and subsequently, whether it resonates or not based on how it was presented (or not presented as the case may be).
    Fair enough.

    I don't doubt the story is large or potentially serious, but I've never really gotten the importance of the stories so far in Sc2. The focus on Raynor and Kerrigan on wholly Terran matters (HotS only really use the Zerg as a backdrop to Kerrigan's Terran focused matters) for two-thirds of a trilogy that is supposed to be about the Hybrids is somewhat jarring since the story so far has been about Terran stuff and not Hybrids. So, why should I even care about the Protoss or Hybrids? It's because the game wants us to! That's not how a well crafted story works and as a result, the whole trilogy seems like an unfocused mish-mash of disconnected stories of stuff happening.
    True, the trilogy has spent a lot of time with the Dominion. But there's been hidden stuff to. No hybrids in WoL, but we have the hidden mission and the Zeratul campaign to build up "they're coming, and not in a few years, more like next week." HotS actually scaled it back, really, as I type this post. Sure, we got more info on Narud/Duran, but outside that mission chain yeah, all Dominion stuff. In retrospect, the WoO prologue with Kerrigan attacking a Moebius outpost should have been incorporated into HotS.
    SC2 handle - "DrakeyC, code 929"

    I ARE A PROPHET! I've predicted three major aspects of SC2 correct, more or less.

    June 2007 - I predicted the Protoss campaign would give you new tech as you conducted diplomacy among tribes.

    Hidden Content:
    July 18th 2010 - I predicted Raynor would broadcast information of Mengsk's actions on Tarsonis to discredit him and incite rebellion.


    Hidden Content:
    June 16th 2010 I predicted the Voice in the Darkness was the commanding force behind the Hybrids. I'm calling it half-right.

  4. #24

    Default Re: Starcraft II Cheesy? The Original Isn't Exactly Shakespeare.

    Quote Originally Posted by ragnarok View Post
    Figures. You know when they said it'd come out for the N64 back then, I thought Blizzard was nuts. Very few RTS games can work on a console, as far as I knew, back then....
    Well I was a small child at the time, having only played WarCraft 1 and 2 before that, so when my father bought the game for SC64 I was glued to the screen, despite what many say, I felt the controller worked well enough for the genre.

  5. #25

    Default Re: Starcraft II Cheesy? The Original Isn't Exactly Shakespeare.

    Quote Originally Posted by KaiseStratosTygo View Post
    Well I was a small child at the time, having only played WarCraft 1 and 2 before that, so when my father bought the game for SC64 I was glued to the screen, despite what many say, I felt the controller worked well enough for the genre.
    I see. I wasn't too much older than you back then anyway, though I never got it for the N64, I thought it wouldn't have worked.

  6. #26

    Default Re: Starcraft II Cheesy? The Original Isn't Exactly Shakespeare.

    Quote Originally Posted by Drake Clawfang View Post
    I know the feeling.



    BTW, it always made me raise an eyebrow a bit that Kerrigan just pulls that title for herself out of thin air and everyone goes with it to the point it's synonymous with her name. Did she spend time on this, is there some significance to the title other than it just sounds cool?

    "I am no helpless Cerebrate to be assailed under cover of darkness. I am Princess Pettycoat, and... what? My father called me that as a child. I like that name."
    That's not true, though.

    That scene makes perfect sense. Kerrigan is calling Zeratul a coward and he's saying that he's not afraid to face her. Then Kerrigan boasts that she's not a helpless sack of flesh who's going to roll over and die but "The all-powerful QUEEN OF BLADES!" who will be no victim. It's an incredibly important character-defining moment for both of them. The "Queen of Blades" title is meant to be self-empowering, it's her new identity. She's been a helpless victim and puppet her whole life and now she's taking control. It's why anybody gives themselves a title. To let other people know to fear them, or respect them, or go to them if they need help. And that's why you'd tell it to your enemies.

    The Wings of Liberty scene is a bunch of prophetic nonsense and foreshadowing with half-answers for everything. It literally explains nothing about the plot or what Zeratul and Kerrigan actually want. I guess the insinuation -- which is not very well displayed or showcased -- is that Kerrigan feels there's no hope, and she'll embrace death and destruction when it comes to claim her while Zeratul will look for a solution.

    But that doesn't even really fit Zeratul's character anyway, and it doesn't fit Kerrigan's character. Kerrigan is a fighter. Kerrigan's whole motivation is control, power and self-assurance. She would be more determined than anyone to avert the catastrophe of the rising evil. While Zeratul is a pretty bleak guy. It just showcases a really fundamental lack of understanding when it comes to these characters.


    The Mother of all Queens!

    Thanks to Dynamik- for the signature!

  7. #27

    Default Re: Starcraft II Cheesy? The Original Isn't Exactly Shakespeare.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aldrius View Post
    The Wings of Liberty scene is a bunch of prophetic nonsense and foreshadowing with half-answers for everything. It literally explains nothing about the plot or what Zeratul and Kerrigan actually want. I guess the insinuation -- which is not very well displayed or showcased -- is that Kerrigan feels there's no hope, and she'll embrace death and destruction when it comes to claim her while Zeratul will look for a solution.
    That was Blizzard's problem for trying to keep things a mystery, and ended up not explaining anything in WoL, not that we wanted anyways.

  8. #28

    Default Re: Starcraft II Cheesy? The Original Isn't Exactly Shakespeare.

    Quote Originally Posted by Drake Clawfang View Post
    The Hanson and Tosh missions, while fine subplots, subtract from focus on the Horner and Tychus plots, where the real meat of the plot is.
    It's somewhat debatable that Horner's subplot is the "meat" of WoL's story since like the Hanson and Tosh subplots, it doesn't have any real bearing on how the the third act of WoL's story unfolds. Sure, it features stuff about Mengsk, the Dominion and is seemingly important (only because it has more direct ties to the established mythology but nothing really approaching a storyline in the current installment) but one can see WoL's story only consisting of Tychus' subplot and still have it make complete sense, really. The culmination of Horner's plot (Media Blitz) has as much relevance to the final third act of WoL as it does for the last missions of Hanson and Tosh. I see you've left out Zeratul's plot, which is supposedly what the whole trilogy is about (and therefore even more seemingly important arguably), and yet that is somehow relegated to nothing as well.

    What we're left with is Tychus' macguffin hunt to tie Raynor's story of redemption in WoL and there's problems because there's connection between those two things until the very end. You know, at first I hadn't realised that this (Raynor's redemption) was WoL's story given how many disparate elements there were and how the mission structure made the "middle act" of WoL somewhat non-existent. When Valerian came in and the artifacts purpose were revealed, I thought "Here we go, the story is finally going to start!" only to realise that this was actually the last act of WoL's story! In contrast, HotS narrative structure is much cleaner with a well-defined start-middle-end - it's just that the story being told in HotS wasn't really worth being told, though that's another complete different thing entirely from what I just said....

    Quote Originally Posted by Drake Clawfang View Post
    I always thought that they should have given you less than 200 supply for the campaign, so the player has to rely on small but effective squads to conduct missions, and maybe hiring mercenaries increases your max supply a bit. Or perhaps certain missions reward more credits than others to give players incentive to do them earlier. Blizzard really didn't get as creative as they could have with the campaign.
    The gameplay mechanics were fine since I usually don't think of those when it comes to story and narrative. They got this part right, I think. The gameplay side of things was fun and very creative to me. Sure, they could've served the story more but, you know, inherent gameplay/story segregation kinda makes it hard to strike that balance.

    Quote Originally Posted by Drake Clawfang View Post
    Zeratul is just as melodramatic as in SC2, refusing to give straight answers to folks and talking them into realizations instead, because he thinks people trust information they deduce on their own more than what other people tell them outright.
    Oh, don't get me wrong, Zeratul is melodramatic. There's no denying that. It's just that he's more of a poet and has a certain quality to him in Sc1 unlike his Sc2 counterpart. The writing is what distinguishes it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Drake Clawfang View Post
    True, the trilogy has spent a lot of time with the Dominion.
    Wasn't referring to a specific faction per se when I said that the focus has been on Terran matters - I meant it more generically, as in "Human matters".

    Quote Originally Posted by Drake Clawfang View Post
    But there's been hidden stuff to. No hybrids in WoL, but we have the hidden mission and the Zeratul campaign to build up "they're coming, and not in a few years, more like next week." HotS actually scaled it back, really, as I type this post. Sure, we got more info on Narud/Duran, but outside that mission chain yeah, all Dominion stuff. In retrospect, the WoO prologue with Kerrigan attacking a Moebius outpost should have been incorporated into HotS.
    I guess that's part of the problem - the Hybrid stuff is kinda too under the radar and hidden. It's been overshadowed by the exploits of specific humans that bare no relevance to them. I commented on this being a potential problem even before HotS came out - that all this human stuff was dominating two-thirds of the trilogy when I thought the idea for Sc2 was ostensibly about Hybrids/Xel'Naga. I even went as far as outlining how the storyline in HotS would have to finish off the human stuff by the first third/half and transition onto the Hybrid stuff if they didn't want to create a distinct narrative whiplash. What we did get with HotS now makes that concern a reality. People might expect Sc2 to be about "human matters" based on the first two thirds, which would make LotV focus on Protoss and Hybrids sort of an "odd duckling". On the otherhand, people are celebrating that LotV is finally getting to what they think is the main story. This does not bode well for the trilogy as a whole because it's like my assessment of WoL as standalone - it's (WoL and the Sc2 trilogy as a whole) starting and middle acts are floating around lacking coherence and then, when things actually "start", it's actually the last the act and that's it! This then leads to one considering whether it was worth a three-part act/trilogy when two-thirds of it was really unnecessary in the first place.
    Yes, that's right! That is indeed ME on the right.


    _______________________________________________

  9. #29

    Default Re: Starcraft II Cheesy? The Original Isn't Exactly Shakespeare.

    Quote Originally Posted by Turalyon View Post
    It's somewhat debatable that Horner's subplot is the "meat" of WoL's story since like the Hanson and Tosh subplots, it doesn't have any real bearing on how the the third act of WoL's story unfolds. Sure, it features stuff about Mengsk, the Dominion and is seemingly important (only because it has more direct ties to the established mythology but nothing really approaching a storyline in the current installment) but one can see WoL's story only consisting of Tychus' subplot and still have it make complete sense, really. The culmination of Horner's plot (Media Blitz) has as much relevance to the final third act of WoL as it does for the last missions of Hanson and Tosh. I see you've left out Zeratul's plot, which is supposedly what the whole trilogy is about (and therefore even more seemingly important arguably), and yet that is somehow relegated to nothing as well.
    True. I found it odd HotS has not even a token mention of Media Blitz. Just have Valerian go like "many civilians have left Korhal after my father's hand in the Confederacy's destruction was revealed, and military loyalty is at an all-time low. If the zerg invade, I doubt as many will rally to the defense as would have before."

    What we're left with is Tychus' macguffin hunt to tie Raynor's story of redemption in WoL and there's problems because there's connection between those two things until the very end. You know, at first I hadn't realised that this (Raynor's redemption) was WoL's story given how many disparate elements there were and how the mission structure made the "middle act" of WoL somewhat non-existent. When Valerian came in and the artifacts purpose were revealed, I thought "Here we go, the story is finally going to start!" only to realise that this was actually the last act of WoL's story! In contrast, HotS narrative structure is much cleaner with a well-defined start-middle-end - it's just that the story being told in HotS wasn't really worth being told, though that's another complete different thing entirely from what I just said....
    That's very true, part of the disjointed story is because you're free to do the missions in order. HotS gives small mission chains each with a self-contained story that you commit to once you choose them.

    The gameplay mechanics were fine since I usually don't think of those when it comes to story and narrative. They got this part right, I think. The gameplay side of things was fun and very creative to me. Sure, they could've served the story more but, you know, inherent gameplay/story segregation kinda makes it hard to strike that balance.
    Oh definitely, the campaign's gameplay is far superior to SC1's. It's just that outside the missions themselves, in their impact in the overarcing campaign, they got formulaic. Do a mission, win a few credits, collect some relics or zerg remains and get some research points, go spend your goodies.

    I remember when they were demoing the campaign during development, Blizzard told us we'd be able to buy new units as we liked instead of getting them automatically with a new mission, and certain missions may be more difficult but have greater rewards. Stuff like that would generate more strategy to how we played things instead of just "okay, which mission gives me the unit/research I want next?"

    Oh, don't get me wrong, Zeratul is melodramatic. There's no denying that. It's just that he's more of a poet and has a certain quality to him in Sc1 unlike his Sc2 counterpart. The writing is what distinguishes it.
    Definitely. The only time I think he dipped into melodrama in SC1 was when he talked to Aldaris. "All that you have built on Aiur is a fleeting dream, and your Conclave shall awaken from it to find themselves in a greater nightmare." But that's pretty restrained compared to SC2.

    I guess that's part of the problem - the Hybrid stuff is kinda too under the radar and hidden. It's been overshadowed by the exploits of specific humans that bare no relevance to them. I commented on this being a potential problem even before HotS came out - that all this human stuff was dominating two-thirds of the trilogy when I thought the idea for Sc2 was ostensibly about Hybrids/Xel'Naga. I even went as far as outlining how the storyline in HotS would have to finish off the human stuff by the first third/half and transition onto the Hybrid stuff if they didn't want to create a distinct narrative whiplash. What we did get with HotS now makes that concern a reality. People might expect Sc2 to be about "human matters" based on the first two thirds, which would make LotV focus on Protoss and Hybrids sort of an "odd duckling". On the otherhand, people are celebrating that LotV is finally getting to what they think is the main story. This does not bode well for the trilogy as a whole because it's like my assessment of WoL as standalone - it's (WoL and the Sc2 trilogy as a whole) starting and middle acts are floating around lacking coherence and then, when things actually "start", it's actually the last the act and that's it! This then leads to one considering whether it was worth a three-part act/trilogy when two-thirds of it was really unnecessary in the first place.
    Yeah. I think they should have, and it would have been awesome, if we saw Hybrids in the defense of Korhal somehow. We know from Skeigyr and WoL's hidden mission that Mengsk knew Moebius and Narud were making Hybrids. If Narud gave him the Xel'naga artifact, why not a Hybrid or two hiding in the palace? Make that Mengsk's final trump card after the Odin fails.

    And BTW, on the matter of SC2's good points, that's one. "Remember this, Raynor? It was nice of your criminal partner to leave it here for me." Cue players wetting themselves as they realize what's coming, knowing very intimately how hard it's going to fuck their shit up. And also neat to see nods to Alpha Squadron and the Sons of Korhal with the Dominion strike forces.
    SC2 handle - "DrakeyC, code 929"

    I ARE A PROPHET! I've predicted three major aspects of SC2 correct, more or less.

    June 2007 - I predicted the Protoss campaign would give you new tech as you conducted diplomacy among tribes.

    Hidden Content:
    July 18th 2010 - I predicted Raynor would broadcast information of Mengsk's actions on Tarsonis to discredit him and incite rebellion.


    Hidden Content:
    June 16th 2010 I predicted the Voice in the Darkness was the commanding force behind the Hybrids. I'm calling it half-right.

  10. #30

    Default Re: Starcraft II Cheesy? The Original Isn't Exactly Shakespeare.

    I'm not just ranting, it'd be nice if someone can explain to me why these problems are overlooked in the original game but make people angry at the sequel. I love the sequel and original game fine, but the sequel's problems have been present sine Day 1. I guess the original gets a pass thanks to nostalgia goggles? Both the sequel and original have their moments of bad writing, cheesy dialogue, and dumb characters, but also have a lot of humor, fun, and epicness. So, what's up?
    2 reasons. 1, when I first played SC1, I was a kid, I wasn't genre savvy, and I didn't realize how referential or derivative (which ever you want to call it) so many elements were. My main exposure to sci-fi fantasy was Star Wars, and for Starcraft to take a much grittier approach, with its dystopian setting and backstories involving political assassinations, terrorism, brainwashing, betrayals, and cool alien origin stories, to me that was all exceptional worldbuilding.

    But, nostalgia goggles aside, there are a lot of choices I like better about SC1 than 2. So in both SC1 and 2, they have this thing going where there's infighting in each faction and no side is totally good (except for Raynor,) yadda yadda. But in SC1, balancing the infighting with the outfighting with the other races is all there is to it. Aldaris could have won, Zasz could have gone rogue, killed Kerrigan and taken over, the Confederacy could have come back, whatever, you didn't know how it would go. And the ultimate consequence of that action would just be that that faction got to rule the sector... until more factionalism tore them down again. The one exception being that the Zerg are slightly worse for the other races to have in charge, what with the insatiable appetite for assimilation.

    But then in SC2, now there's prophecies and predestination stuff? And instead of just fighting for power, now, like, galaxies/the universe are at stake? I hate all those 'the whole universe is at stake' plots. Everyone does it and it messes things up, imo. Firefly was neat because you got invested even if what happened to that crew of people didn't matter in the long run, they'd probably just die somewhere. Then for Serenity they made it a saving the galaxy kind of thing and I cared less. The first Robocop was about a single corrupt company/police department/city thing, but for the remake they had to make it so that robocop was the prototype for military robots that would be rolling out across the US and the world, making the whole world at stake.

    I guess maybe I'm just more interested how characters and factions interact with each other when they're just weighing outside risks against their own self-interests. Once the entire universe is at stake it's less interesting. Like, yeah, Zeratul's gonna do anything to save the universe because he believes a prophecy. That's less interesting than finding out more about the mysterious Dark Templar who swooped in with his own motivations to kill a cerebrate, and is in opposition to the Protoss you've seen thus far.

    I think throwing Earth into SC2 would have been interesting. We're personally invested in Earth, so that could raise the stakes, but a significant faction of the Koprulu terrans might just not care, and the Protoss certainly wouldn't. There would be more interesting tension if for one group it was like "gotta save the world," and some Protoss are like "we understand how it sucks to lose a homeworld, we'll join you!" and others are like "who gives a shit about humans, we need to rebuild." I don't care about the whole galaxy though, that's too big and uninteresting.
    Last edited by Robear; 07-17-2015 at 04:06 PM.

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