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Thread: PC Spec for Starcraft 2

  1. #71
    EvilGenius's Avatar Junior Member
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    Default Re: PC Spec for Starcraft 2

    I forgot about the L3 cache xD

    BUT REGARDLESS, the CPU shows up as a Phenom at post (according to the newegg reviews)

    it's not the hardware man... it's the NAME that matters

    (FYI - my CPU is a phenom x2 unlocked... but mulletBen said he didn't want to attempt anything like core unlocking - too technical :P)

    IT IS WORTH NOTING, that messed up cores often become more reliable with higher voltage settings. My 3rd core needs 1.4v to remain stable in prime95 (8-10 hours at a time)
    4th core is unstable all the time, regardless of the voltage.
    Last edited by EvilGenius; 02-22-2011 at 07:58 PM.

  2. #72
    TheEconomist's Avatar Lord of Economics
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    Default Re: PC Spec for Starcraft 2

    Quote Originally Posted by Crazy_Jonny View Post
    By the time the next gen of games come around, most AMD cpus on the market will be outdated anyway... amd processors aren't future proof, regardless of the cores. Just think about what you need now.

    For gaming, I don't recommend athlons, regardless of the cores. Get any Phenom II and itll perform better.
    That's not good advice (ignoring the fact that many games today use quad cores). You can always upgrade a GPU or SLI/CrossFire them. A CPU, however, has to have a compatible motherboard which limits it quite a bit. Get a little more than you need now (i.e. quad core) so that it'll be functional a few years down the road. An i5/i7 will do fine even up to two years into next gen. Spending another 50$-75$ for an upgrade to a quad core is a no brainer, unless you're emulating console games. Especially since the alternative is having to rebuy a CPU before you would have needed to otherwise. It'll save you money in the long run.

    -- Oh, I see. You were talking about Athlons/Phenoms. Yeah, those are already out-dated and won't hold so well a few years down the line. My mistake.

  3. #73

    Default Re: PC Spec for Starcraft 2

    Quote Originally Posted by Crazy_Jonny View Post
    Yes, I agree. AMD socket type are changing constantly, so don't be concerned with what your computer can do 4 or 5 years down the road, unless you're investing in an intel machine or something.

    This is what I'd recommend if you're budget is like, sub 500.

    The Motherboard is DDR2 Crazy_Jonny, that DDR3 Corsair RAM won't fit in it.

    Please don't recommend anything unless you're absolutely certain what you are recommending. You could mislead someone into spending money on incompatible components.


    Also, I'd rather you go for an AM3 motherboard so that you can easily upgrade the CPU to a higher cored one (read 6-core) from the Phenom II x2 when you can afford it later, regardless of the arrival of the new socket. You will get more out of your computer for longer later on. With an AM2/AM2+ mobo with only DDR2 capability, you are limiting yourself by an extreme amount. It is cheaper because it is going to be obsolete soon.


    Look for an 870G or 880G board with USB 3.0 and SATA 3, or even the slightly pricier 890GX and couple it with a Phenom II x2 for now as well as that XMS3 Corsair RAM (4GB DDR3 1600MHz). The Antec 300 case is actually a good choice, as well as the HDD and DVDRW on this low budget. Check if Hitachi or Western Digital have sales on their 1 TB drives though before purchasing.

    I'll post some links tomorrow - need to sleep right now

  4. #74
    dustinbrowder's Avatar Banned
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    Default Re: PC Spec for Starcraft 2

    Quote Originally Posted by protoswarrior View Post
    Yeah. As an example, we are already having different AMD sockets starting from the end of this year or next year. Sandybridge from Intel is already here.

    So, the best thing to do is buy what works best for your budget now, but buy / invest in the components that will increase longevity overall, such as PSU, RAM, Videocard, Motherboard (to some extent) and CPU (to a much lesser extent).
    Actually that is not really true. The Processors are the longest lasting component and are the most future proof, of course if you purchase a good CPU in the first place.

    He will have no problem 4 years from now if he got a phenom II x4 or intel I5 7xx or 8xx or 9xx.

    Compressing rar will still be as fast, new CPU's will just be faster, games are mostly GPU intensive so there is a long way till they require really good CPU, for example Intel P4 2.8GHz and above are supported even these days, how long has it been like 10 years now?

    AMD CPU are supported as well X2 64 are all supported, etc...

    Ram on the other hand doesn't make much difference from DDR, DDR2, DDR3. In fact there are several benchmarks on ram that pit all RAM from 1 to 3 and the DDR1 ram is somewhat slower, but essentially can do its job perfectly and considering its 10+ years old that say a lot.

    Between DDR2 and DDR3 the difference is minimal and even a DDR 533 vs DDR3 1600MHz the difference is barely noticeable in 90% of the applications.

    As for GPU well even if you buy the high end now say the GTX580, chances are you are going to be playing games at high(not highest) 1 year later and medium at lower resolutions in 2 years time.

    So if you don't plan on upgrading your PC for the next 3 years or more its best to go for a good CPU, since you can always and easily upgrade a GPU or ram.

    If you plan on upgrading your PC on 2 or less years, than it doesn't really matter which parts you choose, since you'd be buying a new PC anyways when it starts slowing down.

  5. #75

    Default Re: PC Spec for Starcraft 2

    Efff just use a different mobo... I thought all of them had DDR3 now.
    Hehe, I'm rusty on these things.

    This one does take DDR3 its 5 more dollars... the point I was making is you can still build PCs quite cheap.
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...-189-_-Product
    Last edited by Crazy_Jonny; 02-23-2011 at 12:14 PM.

  6. #76

    Default Re: PC Spec for Starcraft 2

    Quote Originally Posted by dustinbrowder View Post
    Actually that is not really true. The Processors are the longest lasting component and are the most future proof, of course if you purchase a good CPU in the first place.

    He will have no problem 4 years from now if he got a phenom II x4 or intel I5 7xx or 8xx or 9xx.

    Compressing rar will still be as fast, new CPU's will just be faster, games are mostly GPU intensive so there is a long way till they require really good CPU, for example Intel P4 2.8GHz and above are supported even these days, how long has it been like 10 years now?

    AMD CPU are supported as well X2 64 are all supported, etc...

    Ram on the other hand doesn't make much difference from DDR, DDR2, DDR3. In fact there are several benchmarks on ram that pit all RAM from 1 to 3 and the DDR1 ram is somewhat slower, but essentially can do its job perfectly and considering its 10+ years old that say a lot.

    Between DDR2 and DDR3 the difference is minimal and even a DDR 533 vs DDR3 1600MHz the difference is barely noticeable in 90% of the applications.

    As for GPU well even if you buy the high end now say the GTX580, chances are you are going to be playing games at high(not highest) 1 year later and medium at lower resolutions in 2 years time.

    So if you don't plan on upgrading your PC for the next 3 years or more its best to go for a good CPU, since you can always and easily upgrade a GPU or ram.

    If you plan on upgrading your PC on 2 or less years, than it doesn't really matter which parts you choose, since you'd be buying a new PC anyways when it starts slowing down.
    You are missing the point here though db...

    This guy is on a budget, firstly.

    Secondly, CPU-wise, you yourself just stated that even the oldest CPUs are supported and would not show a significant difference in performance with age. However, if you are going for a new build, based on your budget, you should always find a compromise between the best component and the most highly priced one.

    In this case, for this budget, a Phenom II x2 with L3 cache that can be easily oc'd to almost 4.0GHz and the possibility of core unlocking at the same price-point as an Athlon II Quad core, is the most desirable. The thing is, although the AM3 socket is going to be replaced, it will still be alive for at least the next 5 years, during which time you can just add a new 6-core CPU for that socket such as a Ph II x6 1100T and get the most out of your rig for another 5 years without a significant investment for upgrades.

    Thirdly, an AM3 platform is a lot better than an AM2/AM2+ platform simply because it is better designed with capacitors that will make the motherboard last longer without failure or capacitor-leakage risk. Also, newer motherboards consume less power and have very good heat dissipation, esp the MSI, Gigabyte and Asus design.

    And finally, I'd rather have a platform with support for DDR3 now so that when I need to add more RAM in an upgrade, I don;t have to purchase a new motherboard. Say, if I stuck to AM2+ DDR2 memory and 5 years down the road, DDR4 is released with performance significantly higher (by 60% or so) than DDR2, whereas the difference in performance with DDR3 is only about 20%. To keep up with new implementation of the hardware in software and games, I would need to buy a whole new motherbaord, CPU and RAM.

    Whereas, if I were to choose the DDR3 platform today, I can still tolerate a small difference in performance, changing my rig's status from high-end or at least the upper end of midrange to midrange / mainstream. It wouldn't become low-end until later on when new hardware is designed to replace the new DDR4's or the next generation of CPUs from Intel and AMD.

    The main difference would be the money spent today and tomorrow. If I upgrade to a rig that has the most recent features while still keeping a small budget today on an AM3 platform with DDR3, I won't have to spend the same amount in the future to replace these components.


    What do we conclude? Don't be too cheap. Spend your money on components that are going to still allow you to upgrade with minimal budgetary deficits. Choose a CPU that is powerful enough for today's applications and with Overclocking headroom. Choose RAM modules that are from the latest platform to increase longevity and support later on. Components like the PSU, GPU, RAM, HDD and DVDRW are more long-term than the Motherboard and CPU, but the latter still need to be chosen carefully.

    As an example, who still uses PC 133 SDRAM here for Pentium III 700MHz Intel rigs? It is more expensive to buy that RAM today than to buy DDR1 RAM... So, if you choose DDR3 today, you will still be able to buy DDR3 RAM 5 years later at a reasonable price unlike the PC 133 SD RAM's situation.

    Also, choosing a dual core such as the Phenom II x2 is very good compromise between performance and price as you can easily overclock this cpu to work faster and tackle challenging applications/games in the future. And as mentioned before, with the right motherboard, you can tweak core voltages and unlock cores to basically get a triple or quad core out this cpu for the price of a dual core (i.e $150 less). Therefore, choose a motherboard with the latest platform with the lowest price. Any of the AMD 870G, 880G or 890GX platforms will do. The 890GX is about 40$ more expensive but gets you USB3.0, SATA3 and at least 2 PCIe lanes for crossfire at x8/x8, and all the components are well cooled; plus they support 140W CPUs for later when you need to get your hexacore.

  7. #77
    EvilGenius's Avatar Junior Member
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    Default Re: PC Spec for Starcraft 2

    Quote Originally Posted by protoswarrior View Post
    you can tweak core voltages and unlock cores to basically get a triple or quad core out this cpu for the price of a dual core (i.e $150 less). Therefore, choose a motherboard with the latest platform with the lowest price. Any of the AMD 870G, 880G or 890GX platforms will do. The 890GX is about 40$ more expensive but gets you USB3.0, SATA3 and at least 2 PCIe lanes for crossfire at x8/x8, and all the components are well cooled; plus they support 140W CPUs for later when you need to get your hexacore.
    This is pretty much my machine - I re-used my case/psu/hard drive, but the CPU/MOBO/RAM cost me less than $200 on newegg.

    They seem to have made it relatively easy to "future-proof" on a budget.

    As far as overclocking a Phenom II x2 goes, If you unlock a core, your OC will be much more unstable, and crank out a lot of heat. Honestly, I don't recommend OCing an unlocked CPU :P (although, everyone has different luck with them)

  8. #78
    Troa's Avatar Junior Member
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    Default Re: PC Spec for Starcraft 2

    Frankly, I'd recommend waiting until you can afford newer stuff and buy a decent computer, that one is very low end.

  9. #79

    Default Re: PC Spec for Starcraft 2

    Quote Originally Posted by EvilGenius View Post
    Just out of curiosity, do you think anything will take advantage of USB 3.0's full speed? right now, it seems like SSD's can't even keep up with 6gb/s (much less MECHANICAL drives)

    or... (like the quad-core) will it just end up being a gimmick?

    (I have it on my new machine anyway, i was just wondering how practical it will be)
    Not until SSD's get reallly far ahead, but they've already 1/2 in price. So probably in the next 24 months, or when SSD hit mainstream.


    Quote Originally Posted by dustinbrowder View Post

    Ad this is so not true Hyde, its way back to 2008. Right now a lot of programs utilize quad core, six core or more cores.
    Its only games that mostly utilize 2 cores, but that is also changing and any PC first or PC only game is going to be utilizing quad cores.

    AS for programs go, encoding/decoding programs utilize it, compression/decompression programs utilize more cores, video designing, image manipulation, productivity suites, etc... You name it, chances are it supports quad and more cores.

    Not to mention that even if a game doesn't utilize 4 cores and only two, you still have 2 cores that are going to be processing background programs. If you have only two cores, they are going to be processing background programs and SC2 for example at the same time, lowering the speed a bit, depending on how much background processes/programs you have running.
    No. You are missing my point. So when Battlefield 3 Comes out (Uses quad core and is a native 64BIT Direct X 11 game) what would have been cheaper.
    Buying an i7 8XX in 2008-2010, or buying an Intel i7 950 @ 3.0 GHZ "TODAY"




    Quote Originally Posted by TychusFindlay View Post
    @hyde: There's quite a few games that utilize quad cores Dragon Age being one of the best examples.

    Buying a dual core right now would be stupid as, even if there weren't that many games that utilized multiple cores, when the next generation of consoles come out, every game will use at least four cores.
    What Tychus said, its just better to buy a Dual core now and wait until Dual cores don't even exist on the market for midrange CPU's. Yeeeaah Dragon Age 1 or 2? Cause Dragon Age 1 had the longest f-ing loading times due to some memory leak or something, and the game looked "MEH".


    Quote Originally Posted by Crazy_Jonny View Post
    By the time the next gen of games come around, most AMD cpus on the market will be outdated anyway... amd processors aren't future proof, regardless of the cores. Just think about what you need now.

    For gaming, I don't recommend athlons, regardless of the cores. Get any Phenom II and itll perform better.
    This is what I mean.

    Quote Originally Posted by dustinbrowder View Post
    Actually that is not really true. The Processors are the longest lasting component and are the most future proof, of course if you purchase a good CPU in the first place.

    He will have no problem 4 years from now if he got a phenom II x4 or intel I5 7xx or 8xx or 9xx.

    Compressing rar will still be as fast, new CPU's will just be faster, games are mostly GPU intensive so there is a long way till they require really good CPU, for example Intel P4 2.8GHz and above are supported even these days, how long has it been like 10 years now?

    AMD CPU are supported as well X2 64 are all supported, etc...

    Ram on the other hand doesn't make much difference from DDR, DDR2, DDR3. In fact there are several benchmarks on ram that pit all RAM from 1 to 3 and the DDR1 ram is somewhat slower, but essentially can do its job perfectly and considering its 10+ years old that say a lot.

    Between DDR2 and DDR3 the difference is minimal and even a DDR 533 vs DDR3 1600MHz the difference is barely noticeable in 90% of the applications.

    As for GPU well even if you buy the high end now say the GTX580, chances are you are going to be playing games at high(not highest) 1 year later and medium at lower resolutions in 2 years time.

    So if you don't plan on upgrading your PC for the next 3 years or more its best to go for a good CPU, since you can always and easily upgrade a GPU or ram.

    If you plan on upgrading your PC on 2 or less years, than it doesn't really matter which parts you choose, since you'd be buying a new PC anyways when it starts slowing down.
    Dude you just contradicted yourself.
    Yes, if I bought an Intel i7 990X CPU today for 1100$ USD I would be future proof and totally freaking broke.
    What do you have to say to those people who bought an old socket 1000$ Pentium 4 with AGP graphic slot, only to have PCI-EXPRESS come out the next year - rendering 75% of their Computer TOTAL GARBAGE





    Back to topic: Just go economical. Brand of ram really doesn't matter, espescially on a midrange box. Top end stuff might have Intel XMP profiles for lazy man's OC'ing but thats about it. I've never heard of RAM failing, they all have lifetime warrantys for a reason.

    The PSU thing really depends if you intend on upgrading your BOX and/or if you live in a storm prone area. You should all hook your PC via at least a powerbar or some backup device, but a good PSU can survive some minor shortages/hits in your electrical area. If you have the $ to shell out, maybe try for a 600W Corsair?
    Last edited by hyde; 02-24-2011 at 01:37 PM.


    Quote Originally Posted by dustinbrowder View Post
    You are very weird man. Have you no logic?
    And again you had to be pretty big noob about PC not to know about the change, I mean even the birds on the trees knew about it.

    ...Its like calling throwing stone an athletic competition. Get a grip man and don't write nonsense...
    Shot put anyone?

  10. #80
    dustinbrowder's Avatar Banned
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    Default Re: PC Spec for Starcraft 2

    Yes, if I bought an Intel i7 990X CPU today for 1100$ USD I would be future proof and totally freaking broke.
    You are very weird man. Have you no logic?

    Even read what i wrote? I said between I5 to I7 and Phenom II x4. This means a wide variety of processors of which only 2 are above $500.

    Even the 6 cores got price reduced recently, one is as low as $450.

    Anyways phemon ii x4 955BE for example is 100 euros and it very future proof.

    Also if you haven't had a clue about hardware I can see how you didn't know PCI-E was coming out and even then Nvidia developed 2 generations for AGP and ATI 4 generations for AGP so its not like you were out of purchase options.

    And again you had to be pretty big noob about PC not to know about the change, I mean even the birds on the trees knew about it.

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