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Thread: 'Over the Transom', a memoir by Eugene Uttley.

  1. #1

    Default 'Over the Transom', a memoir by Eugene Uttley.

    While researching some more info on schizophrenia, I came across this memoir written by an author chronicling his battle with and recovery from schizophrenia. I figure, opportunities to learn about this rather mysterious mental illness this in-depth come few and far between, so any of our members interested in psychology might find this an interesting read.

    Hell, I was surprised to learn some new strategies for coping, that certain thoughts I have are actually common among schizophrenia, and that my strategies I already have for dealing with the disease are actually quite effective -- and I'm only on page 15. If you are coping with the disease like myself, or know somebody who is, or are just interested in abnormal psychology, you'll find this an interesting read.

    Though I've been up for over 30 hours now, so I'm having trouble focusing on the book.

    Regardless, here it is.

  2. #2

    Default Re: 'Over the Transom', a memoir by Eugene Uttley.

    Schizophrenia is when you have voices in your head telling you to kill the President of some backwater African country, right?

  3. #3

    Default Re: 'Over the Transom', a memoir by Eugene Uttley.

    Quote Originally Posted by DemolitionSquid View Post
    Schizophrenia is when you have voices in your head telling you to kill the President of some backwater African country, right?
    Yessir.

  4. #4

    Default Re: 'Over the Transom', a memoir by Eugene Uttley.

    Sweet. Wish I had a Kindle to put this on.

    I've heard schizophrenia described as being like a dream. When you or I have a dream, we can't tell it's a dream; but then we wake up, and it becomes obvious. For someone with schizophrenia, though, they can never tell the difference. It's like they never wake up. The real and unreal blend together in so seamless a manner.

    One possible use of dreams is as a scenario simulator. "What if I'm in this situation?" your brain might ask. Well, by nature our brains are geared for violence and the wild, so it usually plays with our fight-or-flight instincts. The same probably holds true for schizophrenia, which may be why schizos tend to have more paranoid delusions. Though I've heard of pleasant ones, too.

    Very interesting disorder.
    Aaand sold.


    Be it through hallowed grounds or lands of sorrow
    The Forger's wake is bereft and fallow

    Is the residuum worth the cost of destruction and maiming;
    Or is the shaping a culling and exercise in taming?

    The road's goal is the Origin of Being
    But be wary through what thickets it winds.

  5. #5

    Default Re: 'Over the Transom', a memoir by Eugene Uttley.

    If you don't mind me asking Muspelli, what exactly does your level of schizophrenia involve? From what I understand of the ''disease'', a variety of symptoms can occur making it hard to actually know what exactly is the disorder.

  6. #6

    Default Re: 'Over the Transom', a memoir by Eugene Uttley.

    Quote Originally Posted by sandwich_bird View Post
    If you don't mind me asking Muspelli, what exactly does your level of schizophrenia involve? From what I understand of the ''disease'', a variety of symptoms can occur making it hard to actually know what exactly is the disorder.
    How does mine manifest? Incomprehensible whispering, random insults (though audial hallucinations are rare for me), shadowy figures, demonic encounters, intense paranoia of pretty much everyone, delusional parasitosis, persecutory delusions. I'm lucky enough to have retained my lucidity, so they aren't true delusions -- I am aware the thoughts are incorrect, but I still 'believe' them to be true to an extent. For example, I know it to be impossible that my friends can hear my thoughts, but I still catch myself thinking they can at times.

    I've been diagnosed despite being apparently prodromal; I've never had a full-on psychotic episode due to the illness.

    I have developed several means of dismissing delusions, paranoia, and hallucinations as well, which is probably a contributor to my previously mentioned lucidity.

  7. #7

    Default Re: 'Over the Transom', a memoir by Eugene Uttley.

    I have had a great revelation of the universe. I cannot describe in words what I have come to learn. I can't help but think without schizophrenia, without my ever-so-slightly altered state of existence, I may never have come to this truly beautiful realization. Though the disease is terrible in nature, that terribleness is a necessity of existence. I am eternally grateful for my lot in life. It's like all the pain and sorrow I have ever felt has left my body completely.

  8. #8

    Default Re: 'Over the Transom', a memoir by Eugene Uttley.

    Which version of you said that?

  9. #9

    Default Re: 'Over the Transom', a memoir by Eugene Uttley.

    The one that is, unusually, not experiencing a single schizophrenic symptom, and hasn't been for a couple days. Am confused on that one.

  10. #10
    TheEconomist's Avatar Lord of Economics
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    Default Re: 'Over the Transom', a memoir by Eugene Uttley.

    Quote Originally Posted by DemolitionSquid View Post
    Schizophrenia is when you have voices in your head telling you to kill the President of some backwater African country, right?
    Good, I was worried about the voice that told me to kill some backwater African in my neighborhood.

    If you really want to understand your revelations, research Dopamine and the effects it has on your perception of reality. That's really all most mental illnesses are.
    Last edited by TheEconomist; 11-29-2012 at 10:38 PM.



    Rest In Peace, Old Friend.

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