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Gradius
06-24-2009, 04:45 PM
A few interviews with the best StarCraft II player in the world - David Kim - have just surfaced. The first interview by chosun.com (http://game.chosun.com/) has been translated by JinSol of TeamLiquid.net (http://www.teamliquid.net/):


We met a Korean developer of Blizzard Entertainment’s anticipated RTS game Starcraft II.

David Kim (Korean name Kim Tae Hyun) appeared in the 3rd battle report and showcased talent of a pro gamer to become a topic among the gaming community. He is one of the 50 core developers of StarCraft II.

Although he won’t reveal details about StarCraft II, he had a light conversation with the reporter about his pride at being a developer for Blizzard.

Q: How did you come to work in a foreign country?
A: I was born in Korea and went to college in Vancouver, Canada, majoring in computer science. I was going to work for programming for the “Company of Heroes” and “Warhammer 4000” series but then became a balance designer for Relic.

What is the difference between Blizzard and Relic?
A: For both companies excelling in making RTS games, it seems like Blizzard concerns more for the eSports side while Relic concerns more about diverse methods of play. The companies individually, make their games fun and they are both great companies.

Q: What job do you hold in Blizzard?
A: I am a balance designer for StarCraft II. In other words, I make it so that units are needed in certain situations and also make it so that the units are used well in all games. The main goal right now is to match the unit’s characteristics to its race characteristics.

Q: What do you think is Blizzard’s strengths?
A: It is that anybody can express their opinion equally. Any concern, regardless of job, is discussed freely. Also, in each division there are extremely skilled people that are chosen as the leader so as the work progresses, it is arranged that there is a lot of agreement.

Q: What game do you enjoy usually?
A: My first online game is ‘World of Warcraft’. I am raising an undead mage. I am looking forward to the game ‘AION’.

Q: Your StarCraft II skill level?
A: I am ranked 1st in the current ladder. However, when the game comes out, I will probably get owned by the gamers in Korea (laugh).
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SC:L has translated another interview by freechal.com (http://osen.freechal.com/):


In a previous survey, when 20 year olds were asked what job they wanted most, the most common answer that was given was to become a game company employee. And then, out of those who do work for a game company, where is the place they most want to go? It is the company that is famous for the StarCraft and WarCraft series, Blizzard.

Blizzard, situated in Irvine, California, in the United States, is an international business that has about 3000 employees from America, Europe, and Asia come to work for them. Blizzard, established in 1991, went from a third party developer to the current best entertainment software publisher.

Among the 3000 employees there is one who works at the main building of Blizzard in Irvine, a Korean who is proudly working his hardest. It is the one who made his name well-known through the StarCraft 2 Battle Reports 1, 2, and 3, David Kim (27). Kim Tae Yun (his Korean name) is the person we’ll be talking to.

David Kim, who finished high school in Korea and went over to Canada, decided at the WWI 2007 StarCraft 2 announcement to become a Blizzard employee. At the time, the company that David Kim was working at was Relic Entertainment, famous for its Warhammer series.

In the winter of 2007 David Kim succeeded in getting his aspired-to employment at Blizzard. Now employed at Blizzard, David Kim became a balance designer for StarCraft 2, having his name become known among eSports fans.

The following is a Question and Answer with David Kim.

- What is the role of a balance designer?
There is the role of creating the battlefield, but also the unit counters between races and the designing of the terrain in terms of mutiplay are things I am in charge of.

- Since when did you have been interested in games? And could you also describe the process of getting employed by Blizzard?
I first gained interest in games while playing the Dragonball series on the Super Famicom. After graduating high school, I started university studies in Canada, and I naturally found work at a Canadian game company. After hearing the 2007 StarCraft 2 announcement, I came to work at the company that I had always been interested in.

- What are the things you feel are positive when working at Blizzard? Also could you give some advice to the people who hope to become balance designers?
The most enjoyable thing is that I am fond of Blizzard games. The very fact that I am working on something I love is enjoyable. That an expert from each field could get together is also another positive point. And for balance designers, I think that getting prepared for one thing at a time would be beneficial. Rather than simply playing a game well, contemplating the counters and relations between units, or the differences between the races and thinking about improvement is what I think should be done.

- What would you say are the kinds of people that Blizzard wants?
Truthfully, I don’t know besides the job I have now. But it seems like skill is most important. Of course, I think it is people that, in times where there is work requiring cooperation, can understand and communicate ideas well, decide things together, and look for solutions that everyone, regardless of rank, position, or ability can agree on.Sources:
GameChosun - David Kim Interview (http://game.chosun.com/article/view.php?no=60676)
FreeChal - David Kim interview (http://osen.freechal.com/news/view.asp?code=G0906240019)

Norfindel
06-25-2009, 07:34 AM
And for balance designers, I think that getting prepared for one thing at a time would be beneficial. Rather than simply playing a game well, contemplating the counters and relations between units, or the differences between the races and thinking about improvement is what I think should be done.
I hope that everyone would accept now that you don't need to have >100 APM to voice your opinion about the game.

Bisso
06-28-2009, 03:41 PM
I hope that everyone would accept now that you don't need to have >100 APM to voice your opinion about the game.

anyway, alot of the APM we see in videos are done just for the l33t look of it. I oftenly see progamers just clicking everywhere on everything without doing anything, just to look like they are doing something.

Yes APM can be a good preview of a player speed, but still. I already see alot of people just clicking stuff to boost up the APM just to look better on paper.

Pandonetho
06-28-2009, 04:25 PM
anyway, alot of the APM we see in videos are done just for the l33t look of it. I oftenly see progamers just clicking everywhere on everything without doing anything, just to look like they are doing something.

Then you're not watching pro gamers because pro gamers don't have time to click about everything without actually doing anything.

Norfindel
06-28-2009, 06:35 PM
Well, if you want a Dragoon to move somewhere, you should try to convince him, by clicking like crazy. Pathing works this time, so it would not be needed anymore... until someone brings attention about the skill drop, and Blizzard inserts some APM sink that makes the Stalker move faster, or deal double damage, or something like that :rolleyes:.

Nicol Bolas
07-02-2009, 07:08 PM
Then you're not watching pro gamers because pro gamers don't have time to click about everything without actually doing anything.

They do in the early going. However, they are actually doing something; they're warming up their hands. The very early game doesn't require enough APM compared to once more units start coming out, so they click around to keep their hands "warm".